Too Many Houses, Too Few Homes

For an excellent analysis of how our abandonment of the Scriptural model of the family consisting of a father, a mother, and children has contributed to our current economic woes, see "Demographics & Depression," by David P. Goldman, in the May, 2009 issue of First Things, available online at http://www.firstthings.com/article.php3?id_article=6564.

A brief excerpt will give you a little insight into the author's analysis:

Now, consider this fact: America’s population has risen from 200 million to 300 million since 1970, while the total number of two-parent families with children is the same today as it was when Richard Nixon took office, at 25 million. In 1973, the United States had 36 million housing units with three or more bedrooms, not many more than the number of two-parent families with children—which means that the supply of family homes was roughly in line with the number of families. By 2005, the number of housing units with three or more bedrooms had doubled to 72 million, though America had the same number of two-parent families with children.

The number of two-parent families with children, the kind of household that requires and can afford a large home, has remained essentially stagnant since 1963, according to the Census Bureau. Between 1963 and 2005, to be sure, the total number of what the Census Bureau categorizes as families grew from 47 million to 77 million. But most of the increase is due to families without children, including what are sometimes rather strangely called “one-person families.”

In place of traditional two-parent families with children, America has seen enormous growth in one-parent families and childless families. The number of one-parent families with children has tripled. Dependent children formed half the U.S. population in 1960, and they add up to only 30 percent today. The dependent elderly doubled as a proportion of the population, from 15 percent in 1960 to 30 percent today.

1 comment:

Erich Heidenreich, DDS said...

Excellent article. Thanks for posting it.